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Pterygium

Membrane growing from the nasal side of the eye
Pterygium is a raised, wedge-shaped growth of the conjunctiva. It is most common among those who live in tropical climates or spend a lot of time in the sun. Symptoms may include irritation, redness, and tearing. Pterygiums are nourished by tiny capillaries that supply blood to the tissue. For some, the growth remains dormant; however, in other cases it grows over the central cornea and affects the vision. As the pterygium develops, it may alter the shape of the cornea, causing astigmatism. If the pterygium invades the central cornea, it is removed surgically.

Since pterygiums are most commonly caused by sun exposure, protecting the eyes from sun, dust and wind is recommended. Instilling artificial tears liberally is also helpful to decrease irritation. In some cases, steroid drops are prescribed to reduce inflammation.


Images and information related to Eye Conditions on this website have been kindly provided courtesy of St. Luke's Cataract & Laser Institute and adapted for the International Guide Dog Federation website. This on-line information is for educational and communication purposes only and should not be construed as personal medical advice. Information published on this website is not intended to replace, supplant, or augment a consultation with an eye care professional regarding the viewer/user's own medical care. The International Guide Dog Federation disclaims any and all liability for injury or other damages that could result from use of the information obtained from this site